Sports Ratings Report for Week of October 21-27

Sports Ratings Highlights for Week of October 21-27

Numbers compiled from a variety of sources, including TV by the Numbers, The Futon Critic, Sports Media Watch, and Son of the Bronx.

 

Vwr (mil) 

HH 

18-49 

Net

NFL: Regional coverage
(main game: Redskins @ Broncos)

25.499 

15.3 

8.9 

FOX 

Sunday Night Football:
Packers @ Vikings

16.893 

  

6.3 

NBC 

World Series, Game 4:
Red Sox @ Cardinals

15.975 

  

4.6 

FOX 

NFL: Regional coverage 

15.5 

9.7 

  

FOX 

NFL: Regional coverage (or 4 PM ET)

15.2 

9.3 

  

CBS 

Monday Night Football:
Vikings @ Giants

14.383 

9.1 

4.9 

ESPN+
Locals

World Series, Game 1:
Cardinals @ Red Sox

14.4 

  

4.3 

FOX 

World Series, Game 2:
Cardinals @ Red Sox

13.429 

  

3.6 

FOX 

World Series, Game 3:
Red Sox @ Cardinals

12.473 

7.4 

3.3 

FOX 

Thursday Night Football:
Panthers @ Buccaneers

4.94 

3.1 

1.8 

NFLN+
Locals

NASCAR

4.316 

2.7 

1.0 

ESPN 

CFB: Penn State @ Ohio State 

4.059 

2.5 

1.1 

ABC 

CFB: Tennessee @ Alabama 

4.03 

2.6 

  

CBS 

CFB: Texas Tech @ Oklahoma (part 1) 

3.8 

2.4 

  

FOX 

CFB: UCLA @ Oregon 

3.674 

2.3 

1.2 

ESPN 

CFB: Michigan State @ Illinois
or NC State @ Florida State

3.3 

2.2 

  

ABC 

Read moreSports Ratings Report for Week of October 21-27

The Studio Show Scorecard for Week of October 21-27

PT Rnk

TD Rnk

Oct Distr.
(000)
PT Vwr
(000)
LW/LY TD Vwr
(000)
TD HH TD Vwr
LW/LY

1

=

1

=

98891

3055

+14%

1295

0.9

+6%

=

=

85%

3055

+14%

1295

+6%

+9%

3

=

2

=

98861

731

+15%

309

0.2

+4%

=

=

85%

731

+10%

309

+3%

+4%

2

=

3

=

72464

762

-17%

238

0.2

-13%

=

=

63%

1040

-6%

325

-12%

-6%

4

=

4

=

90121

177

-34%

111

0.1

-23%

=

=

78%

194

+33%

121

-20%

+3%

5

=

5

=

79145

154

-25%

83

0.0

+5%

+1

+3

68%

192

+40%

104

+22%

+85%

7

+2

6

+3

75603

98

+44%

81

0.0

+60%

n/a

n/a

65%

128

n/a

106

+132%

n/a

8

=

7

-1

82964

94

+25%

75

0.1

+28%

-1

-2

72%

112

-10%

90

+103%

+25%

9

-2

8

-1

75829

85

+6%

61

0.0

+6%

-1

-1

65%

111

+33%

80

+15%

+28%

6

=

9

-1

59950

114

-7%

46

0.0

-12%

-1

-3

52%

188

-3%

76

-16%

-8%

10

=

10

=

71026

42

+27%

45

0.0

+14%

-1

-1

61%

58

+56%

63

+13%

+34%

Okay, look, I’ll level with you. I thought I had found a way to not have this project monopolize all my time when I started it, but that clearly isn’t the case. These posts are really tedious, starting with scrolling through each week’s schedule and making note of any pre-emptions or modifications, continuing as I go through each individual show – something that seems like it goes by pretty breezily as I’m doing it (so long as I’m not doing a repeating nightly highlight show that’s not SportsCenter, especially if it’s leading out of a live sporting event… shudder) but where the sheer quantity of shows causes it to bog down, all for something of tangential importance at best to what I personally am really interested in, which is the ratings for the actual sporting events.

The week-by-week fluctuations in the shows aren’t very important, and any changes are going to occur slowly over a very long term, other than in-season fluctuations for the sport-specific networks, although I am interested in the short-term bump shows on smaller networks (especially Fox Sports 1) get from popular sporting events. The main reason I decided to do this is because I like the concept, but all my data comes from a single site that anyone can check for themselves (and they are), even if I give the same data in a more user-friendly format, and I’m not getting much of any sort of bump for these posts (not that I’m getting any for the main ratings posts either, but I’m playing a long game there). I’ll do next week’s post, but I have a new Da Blog Poll up asking if I should keep doing these.

All numbers are in thousands of viewers and are from Son of the Bronx.

Read moreThe Studio Show Scorecard for Week of October 21-27

2013 MLB Ratings Wrap-Up, Part III: Postseason Games

Here are the viewership numbers for every game of the MLB postseason, including 18-49 ratings for most games, sorted by viewership and including the tiebreaker game between the Rays and Rangers. Click here to see them sorted by series.

The Red Sox’ clincher in Game 6 of the World Series was the most-watched baseball game of the year, attracting over 19 million viewers. Unsurprisingly, especially with the Red Sox in the ALCS and World Series, every primetime game on Fox beat every game on TBS; in fact, the most watched game on TBS was a division series game, the Cardinals’ clincher in Game 5 against the Pirates. This also meant the Red Sox were involved in the 11 most-watched games of the postseason.

The most-watched game on TBS outside of primetime likely depends on definition; either Tigers-Athletics Game 4, which began at 5 PM ET, or Cardinals-Dodgers Game 5, which began at 4 PM ET. Both games had over 3.7 million viewers. The two games starting at 3 PM ET were the least-watched games on TBS; the Red Sox factor could not save Rays-Red Sox Game 1 from being the single least-viewed game on TBS. Depending on definition, the least-viewed primetime game was either Pirates-Cardinals Game 1 at 5 PM ET; the Rays-Rangers tiebreaker; or Tigers-Athletics Game 2.

28 games had more viewers than the most-watched regular season game window of the season. For perspective, a total of 36 or 37 games aired on Fox and TBS. If the Rays-Rangers tiebreaker is considered a regular season game, it was the second-most viewed of the season on cable; in all, 19 of 24 or 25 games on TBS attracted more viewers than any regular-season game on ESPN.

Of MLB Network’s two games, Athletics-Tigers Game 3 attracted a larger audience with 912,000 viewers. Pirates-Cardinals Game 2 lagged behind with 832,000 viewers.

All numbers from TVbytheNumbers, The Futon Critic, and Son of the Bronx with additional info from Sports Media Watch (see link above).

Read more2013 MLB Ratings Wrap-Up, Part III: Postseason Games

Sunday Night Football Flex Scheduling Watch: Week 9

NBC’s Sunday Night Football package gives it flexible scheduling. For the last seven weeks of the season, the games are determined on 12-day notice, 6-day notice for Week 17.

The first year, no game was listed in the Sunday Night slot, only a notation that one game could move there. Now, NBC lists the game it “tentatively” schedules for each night. However, the NFL is in charge of moving games to prime time.

Here are the rules from the NFL web site (note that this was written with the 2007 season in mind, hence why it still says late games start at 4:15 ET instead of 4:25):

  • Begins Sunday of Week 11
  • In effect during Weeks 11-17
  • Only Sunday afternoon games are subject to being moved into the Sunday night window.
  • The game that has been tentatively scheduled for Sunday night during flex weeks will be listed at 8:15 p.m. ET.
  • The majority of games on Sundays will be listed at 1:00 p.m. ET during flex weeks except for games played in Pacific or Mountain Time zones which will be listed at 4:05 or 4:15 p.m. ET.
  • No impact on Thursday, Saturday or Monday night games.
  • The NFL will decide (after consultation with CBS, FOX, NBC) and announce as early as possible the game being played at 8:15 p.m. ET. The announcement will come no later than 12 days prior to the game. The NFL may also announce games moving to 4:05 p.m. ET and 4:15 p.m. ET.
  • Week 17 start time changes could be decided on 6 days notice to ensure a game with playoff implications.
  • The NBC Sunday night time slot in “flex” weeks will list the game that has been tentatively scheduled for Sunday night.
  • Fans and ticket holders must be aware that NFL games in flex weeks are subject to change 12 days in advance (6 days in Week 17) and should plan accordingly.
  • NFL schedules all games.
  • Teams will be informed as soon as they are no longer under consideration or eligible for a move to Sunday night.
  • Rules NOT listed on NFL web site but pertinent to flex schedule selection: CBS and Fox each protect games in five out of six weeks, and cannot protect any games Week 17. Games were protected after Week 4 in 2006 and 2011, because NBC hosted Christmas night games those years and all the other games were moved to Saturday (and so couldn’t be flexed), but are otherwise protected after Week 5.
  • In the past, three teams could appear a maximum of six games in primetime on NBC, ESPN or NFL Network (everyone else gets five) and no team may appear more than four times on NBC. I don’t know how the expansion of the Thursday Night schedule affects this, if it does. No team starts the season completely tapped out at any measure; six teams have five primetime appearances each, but only the 49ers don’t have at least one game that can be flexed out. A list of all teams’ number of appearances is in my Week 5 post.

Here are the current tentatively-scheduled games and my predictions:

Week 11 (November 17):

  • Selected game: Kansas City @ Denver. Apparently CBS oh-so-graciously agreed to “voluntarily” give up its protection on this game to allow it to be seen by a national audience since they only had the singleheader this week; whether or not this has any impact on future weeks is unclear (especially since CBS still has no reason to protect Week 12), and CBS may end up getting paid back next year, but we may surmise from this the “Chiefs-Broncos rule”: if the singleheader network’s protected game is particularly strong, the NFL may overrule it and put it on NBC anyway. Presumably this will be less of an issue when the new contract kicks in next year, when games can move between CBS and Fox (especially since the general consensus seems to be that this is just to ensure a quality game in the late-afternoon doubleheader slot), except that Fox has a pretty strong game of its own in Niners-Saints; I would presume the NFL’s philosophy will be to make sure the two best games are in the two national television timeslots unless the NBC tentative game is good enough for the tentative game bias to kick in, but I have no idea how protection will work in the new contract.

Week 12 (November 24):

  • Tentative game: Denver @ New England
  • Prospects: 7-1 v. 7-2 and Manning v. Brady. No force on Earth could budge this game from this spot, which is why both networks chose to leave this week unprotected. (Does the fact Cowboys-Giants wasn’t protected say more about this game, or the NFC East tire fire?)
  • Protected games: None.
  • Other possible games: Chargers-Chiefs, Panthers-Dolphins, and Colts-Cardinals are the main options…
  • Analysis: …but all involve 4-4 teams and the least lopsided is Panthers-Dolphins at 5-3 v. 4-4. None of them can actually get better than Broncos-Patriots, which is killer given the double whammy of the tentative game bias and the general national appeal.
  • Final prediction: Denver Broncos @ New England Patriots (no change).

Week 13 (December 1):

  • Tentative game: NY Giants @ Washington
  • Prospects: 2-6 v. 3-5. The name value and NFC East tire fire helps, but these are the worse two teams in the division.
  • Protected games: Broncos-Chiefs (CBS) and Bears-Vikings (FOX).
  • Other possible games: Thanksgiving weekend, paucity of good games; Titans-Colts, Dolphins-Jets, and Bengals-Chargers are all options, but all involve 4-4 teams and none have much in the way of name value. And CBS has the doubleheader this week so the NFL isn’t rescuing Broncos-Chiefs for NBC again either.

Week 14 (December 8):

  • Tentative game: Atlanta @ Green Bay
  • Prospects: 2-6 v. 5-3. Doesn’t look good.
  • Protected games: Colts-Bengals (CBS) and Seahawks-49ers (FOX).
  • Other possible games: Panthers-Saints is looking very strong to give Cam Newton his first NBC game with only one game separating the two for the NFC South crown. Titans-Broncos is a dark horse but might be too lopsided to compete.

Week 15 (December 15):

  • Tentative game: Cincinnati @ Pittsburgh
  • Prospects: If I told you before the season that this game would be 6-3 v. 2-6 after Week 9, and you didn’t have the bye week schedule on hand, would you have ever guessed that the Steelers would be the 2-6 team?
  • Protected games: Packers-Cowboys (FOX) and Patriots-Dolphins (CBS).
  • Other possible games: Jets-Panthers is the best option at the moment, with Cardinals-Titans lurking, but overall this is a pretty uninspiring slate of options.

Week 16 (December 22):

  • Tentative game: New England @ Baltimore
  • Prospects: 7-2 v. 3-5; pretty lopsided, but the name value could still save it if it weren’t for the strong alternatives.
  • Protected games: Broncos-Texans (CBS) and Cowboys-Indians (FOX).
  • Other possible games: Very surprised CBS chose to protect Broncos-Texans, a game involving a team that was 2-3 and in a tailspin at the time (and hasn’t won since), instead of Colts-Chiefs, two teams now leading their respective divisions and with two losses between them. Perhaps CBS had its eye more on getting Pats-Ravens back. Saints-Panthers is also an option if Colts-Chiefs collapses, and Cardinals-Seahawks is waiting in the wings.

Week 17 (December 29):

  • Playoff positioning watch begins next week because let’s face it, this is probably going to be an NFC East title game, which means more likely than not it’s going to be Eagles-Cowboys.

2013 MLB Ratings Wrap-Up, Part II: MLB Network Regular Season Games

Here are the viewership numbers for most if not all games on MLB Network for the 2013 season.

Seven of the top eight, nine of the top eleven, twelve of the top sixteen, and fourteen of the twenty most-watched games on MLB Network involved either the Red Sox or Yankees, with the top game being an “MLB Network Showcase” game between the teams at Fenway Park September 13 that attracted 450,000 viewers. Games between the Red Sox and Yankees also finished fifth, seventh, eighth, tenth, sixteenth, and eighteenth. The Yankees also produced the most-watched “matinee” game, when they hosted the Twins July 13 and attracted 408,000 viewers. The most-watched American League game not to involve either team was the Orioles at the White Sox on the Fourth of July, which attracted 319,000 viewers, only enough for 22nd among all MLB Network games.

The National League was not much better balanced. The five most-watched NL games involved either the Cardinals or Braves, including two games between the teams; in fact, the most-watched NL game not to involve either team, the Giants-Reds “Showcase” game July 2, didn’t do much better than Orioles-White Sox at 320,000 viewers. A Cubs-Braves game on April 5 was the most-watched game not to involve the Yankees with 433,000 viewers. The Mets were able to attract audiences when they were playing the Yankees; of the four games involving the Yankees and Red Sox in the top eleven that weren’t against one another, two were part of the Subway Series, including a game at Citi Field on May 27 that placed second overall (and was the most-watched non-“Showcase” game) with 444,000 viewers.

However, having one of the Yankees, Red Sox, Cardinals, or Braves was no guarantee of getting a big audience, especially for an afternoon game. The least-watched game in my records was between the Royals and Braves on April 17, a game only 80,000 people watched. The least-watched primetime game was Nationals-Cardinals September 23, with 115,000 viewers, which actually edged out a Rangers-Yankees afternoon game, and the least-watched “Showcase” game was the Civil Rights Game between the Rangers and White Sox that attracted 173,000 viewers August 24, followed by Cardinals-Reds June 7 with 215,000 viewers.

All numbers from Son of the Bronx.

Read more2013 MLB Ratings Wrap-Up, Part II: MLB Network Regular Season Games

The Problem With Internet Companies Getting Major Sports Rights

I have a much longer series of posts planned on the broader issues surrounding the current era of sports on television, but I wanted to make this particular point because I think it’s particularly important.

The NFL is reportedly still considering an expansion and splitting of its Thursday night package to sell to another partner, and is reportedly interested in potentially selling games to a tech company like Google or Netflix. This comes as the NBA, still in the process of negotiating its next TV package, has been speculated to potentially also sell games to a tech company. And that comes amidst years of speculation that tech companies like Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, or Netflix, could be the best candidates to challenge ESPN and completely upend the sports TV wars.

But I’m still unconvinced that Internet companies are really the threat they’re made out to be. In my opinion, the speculation surrounding them is mostly superficial and based on only a few factors, without seriously considering the circumstances and what their entry into the market would actually mean, and I don’t believe they’re a realistic candidate to score sports rights, or that if they are that it would turn out to be a good idea, or that if it does that they would really be as revolutionary as they’re cracked up to be.

For one thing, I’m having a hard time seeing exactly how tech companies would distribute games and make money off them. I can’t imagine Google would simply slap games on YouTube, as that would mean they would need to collect money through advertising alone, when the great advantage of sports networks like ESPN is their dual revenue stream of advertising and subscriber fees. That means tech companies would need to restrict access to the games in some way, and most of the options don’t sound very promising. Would Apple restrict games to users of iOS devices and Apple TV, or Google restrict them to users of Android devices and Google TV? That seems like it would have the potential for disaster as people would be shut out for choosing the wrong product, especially if we’re talking about being the equivalent of a national television partner as opposed to getting a piece of the out-of-market package. A company like Netflix could distribute games to its subscribers, but that would be the equivalent of a premium channel at best. The best-case scenario probably involves Facebook or Google effectively blackmailing people into signing up for their services in order to view the games, but even then I’m not seeing how that would help them raise enough money to be competitive with sports networks.

And none of these approaches would avoid the other issues, certainly not the issue of being a middleman. The nature of TV is such that sports benefit from distributing their games through middlemen, which is why none of the sports leagues that own their own networks have abandoned their relationships with other partners; from its humble beginnings as the Outdoor Life Network, the entity now known as the NBC Sports Network has acquired more and more properties to obtain more distribution than any sport-specific network other than Golf Channel and, until this past August, Speed – and those two had a multiple-year head start on gaining distribution before the full effect of the sports TV wars set in. In theory at least, fans of any of its properties can drop in on coverage of any other property, thus broadening the exposure to that property. But the open nature of the Internet already provides exposure to anyone who wants to drop in, so I’m not sure what sports leagues would gain from selling games to Google when they could cut out the middleman and distribute games themselves. In this sense, Major League Baseball has already entered this territory; its MLB.tv service regularly offers one game for free each day to non-customers.

But none of that begins to approach the most fundamental issue, the basic distinction between the Internet and television, which I laid out before: the Internet is good at distributing many programs to a few people, but television is good at distributing a few programs to many people. The Internet effectively consists of one “channel” for each of its customers, meaning you have a channel that you can program yourself, allowing you to watch whatever you want whenever you want. But if many people want to watch the same thing all at once, i.e., some sort of live event (i.e., a live sporting event), they all have to watch it on their own individual “channels” – the server has to serve the event to each individual computer that asks for it. We saw the result with the massive issues NBC had with streaming of events at the London 2012 Olympics, and those didn’t reach more than a million or so people at a time. Things haven’t improved that much since then:

Perhaps the issues surrounding large-scale Internet streaming can be fixed with bigger pipes and more investment in servers and the like, but this structural issue will remain: why distribute the same event many times to each individual customer if you could find a way to distribute the event once and allow anyone, at least with the proper credentials, to hop on the stream with no additional strain on your end? On this front, it’s instructive to see how the mobile world, which (at least at the moment) already lives in the world where all television is over the Internet, is dealing with this issue, and it’s clear that they at least recognize it: AT&T has begun work on a network that will precisely allow them to push video out to many different devices at once. One thing strikes me about this project: it is a completely separate service that requires use of completely separate spectrum from AT&T’s normal 3G/4G network (indeed, spectrum that had most recently been used for a similar service). In other words, once you begin broadcasting the same signal for any device to hop on to, it is no longer the Internet, at least not as we know it. In this particular case, it becomes something fundamentally not that different from over-the-air broadcast television – indeed the spectrum in question may well have once been TV spectrum.

Once the distinction between and relative strengths of TV and the Internet are recognized, it’s clear that at least on a large scale, showing a single live event for everyone to view at once is something the Internet simply is not suited for. The great advantages of the Internet for viewing video are the ability to view it anywhere you want and to watch whatever you want whenever you want, but only the former applies to live events like sports, and even that goes away if the technology is developed to deliver content to many devices at once. Broadcast television is already halfway there, but is currently only reaching mobile devices through optional kludges attached to the existing broadcast standard, rather than having one standard suited to reaching all devices whether stationary or on the go. If the television industry recognizes its place in a future where Internet distribution of video reaches maturity – a place where its purpose becomes refocused specifically on the broadcasting of live events – adopts a standard that maximizes its investment in its existing infrastructure and reorganizes its business accordingly, it can survive and effectively compete in that future for years to come, even if that future is substantially different from what exists now.

2013 MLB Ratings Wrap-Up, Part I: Fox and ESPN Regular Season Games

Here are the viewership numbers for all 100 games on Fox and ESPN this season. Numbers for games on TBS are not available.

The most watched regular season broadcast of the season was a “Baseball Night in America” broadcast on Fox headlined by the Yankees at the Orioles on June 29, which had 3.5 million viewers. Second place was another Baseball Night in America broadcast on June 1 headlined by Red Sox-Yankees, with 3.3 million viewers. The most-watched broadcast on ESPN was another Yankees-Red Sox game with 3.1 million viewers on August 18, which was also the only ESPN game to earn at least a 1.0 adults 18-49 rating. The most-watched game not involving the Yankees was a Baseball Night in America broadcast headlined by the Angels at the Red Sox with 3.1 million viewers on June 8, and the most-watched game not involving the Yankees or Red Sox was a Baseball Night in America broadcast headlined by Rangers-Cardinals on June 22, also with 3.1 million viewers. Fox’s most-watched window outside of June came on July 13, a Baseball Night in America broadcast headlined by Cardinals-Cubs that attracted just under 3 million viewers.

The most-watched Fox window outside of Baseball Night in America was either their first one on April 6, headlined by Yankees-Tigers, with 2.9 million viewers, or another Yankees-Red Sox game on July 20, which did not have viewers reported but had a better rating (2.0 v. 1.9). The most-watched afternoon window not to involve the Yankees came on August 3 and was headlined by Rangers-Athletics. Yankees-Red Sox made up ESPN’s two most-watched games of the year and three of the top four, with third place going to Cardinals-Braves on July 28. Rounding out the top five on ESPN was Dodgers-Giants on May 5, followed by the season-opening game between the Rangers and Astros on March 31 – which only barely edged Fox’s least watched “Baseball Night in America” window, which came May 25 and was headlined by Cardinals-Dodgers. ESPN’s most-watched broadcast outside of Sunday Night Baseball came on August 26, a game between the Reds and Cardinals that attracted 1.3 million viewers – less than Fox’s least-watched Saturday window, which saw 1.4 million viewers on September 21 for a lineup headlined by Giants-Yankees.

Only two games on ESPN2 attracted over a million viewers, both in April: the Sunday Night Baseball game between the Angels and Rangers opposite the Women’s Final Four (1.8 million viewers) and an opening-day game between the Phillies and Braves (1.0 million viewers). The next most-watched games on ESPN2 were a Sunday Night Baseball game between the Mets and Nationals on September 1 (853,000 viewers, the only Sunday Night Baseball game with under a million viewers); a Red Sox-Yankees game on April 3 (833,000 viewers); two late night opening-week games, Giants-Dodgers on April 3 (708,000 viewers) and Cardinals-Diamondbacks on April 1 (704,000 viewers); and Dodgers-Yankees on June 19 (500,000 viewers).

The least-watched game on an ESPN network was Phillies-Reds April 17 on ESPN2, which attracted 296,000 viewers. The least-watched game on regular ESPN that did not spend a substantial amount of time on ESPN2 was Red Sox-Rays May 15 with 467,000 viewers – still higher than the most-watched game on MLB Network.

ESPN numbers from Son of the Bronx with 18-49 numbers from The Futon Critic and TVbytheNumbers. Fox numbers from Sports Media Watch and SportsBusiness Daily; numbers in gray were not available and are interpolated.

Read more2013 MLB Ratings Wrap-Up, Part I: Fox and ESPN Regular Season Games

Sports Ratings Report for Week of October 14-20

Sports Ratings Highlights for Week of October 14-20

Numbers compiled from a variety of sources, including TV by the Numbers, The Futon Critic, Sports Media Watch, and Son of the Bronx.

 

Vwr (mil)

HH

18-49

Net

Sunday Night Football:
Broncos @ Colts

26.943

  

10.0

NBC

NFL: Regional coverage
(main games: HOU/KC and BAL/PIT)

25.319

14.8

8.6

CBS

NFL: Regional coverage (or 4 PM ET)

18.2

10.8

  

FOX

NFL: Regional coverage

13.9

8.7

  

CBS

Monday Night Football:
Colts @ Chargers

12.535

8.1

4.7

ESPN+
Locals

ALCS Game 6

9.041

  

2.3

FOX

ALCS Game 5

8.569

  

2.5

FOX

ALCS Game 4

8.085

  

2.3

FOX

Thursday Night Football

6.821

4.2

2.3

NFLN+
Locals

CFB: Auburn @ Texas A&M

6.7

4.2

  

CBS

NLCS Game 6

6.073

3.7

1.5

TBS

NLCS Game 4

5.792

3.7

1.6

TBS

CFB: Florida State @ Clemson

5.676

3.4

1.9

ABC

ALCS Game 3

5.6

3.7

  

FOX

CFB: UCLA @ Stanford or Iowa @ Ohio St.

5.3

3.4

  

ABC

NASCAR

4.916

3.1

1.1

ESPN

NLCS Game 3

4.825

3.1

1.3

TBS

NLCS Game 5

3.73

2.5

0.8

TBS

CFB: USC @ Notre Dame

3.464

2.2

0.8

NBC

CFB: Tennessee @ South Carolina

3.371

2.3

  

ESPN

Read moreSports Ratings Report for Week of October 14-20